Guide to Buying a Fiddle Leaf Fig

What to look for to bring home a healthy Fiddle Leaf Fig | Dossier Blog

Guys! Over on my Instagram I’ve started Plant Tip Tuesday, where I share a little tip to do with plants each week. Last Tuesday I shared a tip on what to look for when buying a Fiddle Leaf Fig, and realised I could really dedicate a whole blog post on it!

Not because buying a Fiddle Leaf Fig is tricky or daunting, but because I wanted to share a few tips on what to look for when buying a healthy plant, and how you can expect yours to (somewhat) grow, based on how it looks when it’s in the nursery.

So often I’ve picked up a plant in the nursery, given it a once over and brought it home only to discover there’s something wrong after I’ve bought it. But there’s a few things to look for before you buy to avoid getting a plant that could die once you get it home, leaving you wondering what you did wrong!

Most of these tips could be applied to all plants, but I especially wanted to talk about FLFs, as they are so popular right now and are a little bit of my expertise!

 

How to spot a healthy plant at the nursery, including signs of pests, damage and root bound | Dossier Blog

Guide to Buying a Fiddle Leaf Fig

When Buying a Fiddle Leaf Fig, the size of the plant will mostly determine the price. If you’re like me and don’t want to risk losing a mature plant, start small! Once you feel competent caring for them, you can get go big or patiently wait for yours to grow 😉

The first thing you should look for is if the plant generally looks healthy. This means no damaged or discoloured leaves. Unfortunately, plants are not regenerative so if a leaf is damaged or browned, it will stay like this. I often see big, gorgeous FLFs in the nursery, but they haven’t been taken proper care of and some of the leaves are brown and spotted. Its a shame because they will stay like that, and who wants to pay so much money for a mature tree that has forever damaged leaves!

Take a closer look to check for pests. Look for anything small and moving on the leaves, check the undersides and look for small damage such as holes, discolouration or dots. As well as not wanting a pest-infested FLF, if you bring one with bugs home, it can threaten any other plants you have too!

Next, check the base of the plant. Fiddle Leaf Figs can vary from the nursery – some have a single trunk in a pot, while others will have a cluster. This is up to you what you would prefer – keeping in mind how it will look when it grows. A cluster will appear naturally bushy while a single trunk will more easily replicate the popular ‘tree’ form once it grows. These things can be changed, but you might prefer to start with a plant closer to the look you would like to achieve.

Similarly, check the shape – pull back leaves and look if there’s any branches etc. They will be more prominent as the plant grows. You can always prune unwanted branches but its good to be aware of what style you’d prefer.

a young FLF - what to look for to bring home a healthy Fiddle Leaf Fig! | Dossier Blog

 

Another thing to keep in mind with FLFs is that they have thin trunks. To help strengthen their trunks, look for a plant where the leaves are growing close together on the trunk. This will provide support to the trunk and help stop it from leaning. If you look at the photo below, you might initially prefer to buy the FLF on the left, as it is taller. But height isn’t everything! The FLF on the left has less leaves and they are far apart on the trunk. This is a sign that the plant needs more sunlight. Having leaves further apart on the trunk also means the trunk is less supported, more likely to lean, and not getting as much nutrition to these areas to grow the trunk strong.

The FLF on the right may be shorter but will eventually be stronger and more supported, because the leaves are so close together. You can see that they’ve had to stake the FLF on the left, while the FLF on the right is freestanding.

Buying a Fiddle Leaf Fig - can you tell the difference between these two plants? | Dossier Blog

Lastly, check the bottom of the pot – see if there’s any roots showing. A lot of plants in nurseries can be root bound and ready to repot. This is good to know so that you can arrange a pot that is a little bigger than what its in now.

Hopefully these tips will help you bring home a healthy Fiddle Leaf Fig, as well as knowing a little more about what to expect as it grows. If you have any other things to look out for, let me know in the comments below!

If you’ve recently brought home a FLF, check out my other tips on FLFs, including pruning, fertilizing and optimizing the growth and caring for your FLF.

A post shared by Emily Connett (@dossierblog) on

Emily Connett

Blogger

One part travel addict and two parts homebody, I started Dossier Blog in 2015 as a place to document our travels. Since then it has grown to cover my life at home and love of indoor plants and gardening.

No Comments Yet

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Download your FREE
'A-Z Encyclopedia for
Fiddle Leaf Figs'!

SIMPLY ENTER YOUR EMAIL ADDRESS TO DOWNLOAD
"After spending countless hours researching, scrutinising and experimenting on my own Fiddle Leaf Fig. I’m glad the tips & info I’ve found out can now be helpful to you too!"
DOWNLOAD
Written by Emily Connett, Dossier Blog.
close-link